Strategy 2030

A Platform for Change

Results so far

Strategy 2030 stands for

Strategy 2030 is about change. It is about changing not just what we do, but how we do it, so that we are even better able to save lives, accompany people and support their resilience. It is about the changes that are shifting the world today and those that lie ahead.  It is about how these changes present both threats and opportunities to humanity, and how they are shifting the very nature of vulnerability, about who is vulnerable, why, where and for how long. It recognises that new approaches are needed to tackle the persistent challenges that continue to burden people around the world alongside the many new emerging challenges. It is also a strategy of hope and trust  in the power of humanity to mobilise for good and to drive positive change.

This is what we’ve heard so far. The final draft strategy, once approved from the Governing Board, will be available for public comment from the end of May to the end of July.

Strategy 2030

A Platform for Change

Results so far

Strategy 2030 stands for

Strategy 2030 is about change. It is about changing not just what we do, but how we do it, so that we are even better able to save lives, accompany people and support their resilience. It is about the changes that are shifting the world today and those that lie ahead.  It is about how these changes present both threats and opportunities to humanity, and how they are shifting the very nature of vulnerability, about who is vulnerable, why, where and for how long. It recognises that new approaches are needed to tackle the persistent challenges that continue to burden people around the world alongside the many new emerging challenges. It is also a strategy of hope and trust  in the power of humanity to mobilise for good and to drive positive change.

This is what we’ve heard so far. The final draft strategy, once approved from the Governing Board, will be available for public comment from the end of May to the end of July.

Thought pieces from around the network

Latest pieces

MONEY MATTERS: DELIVERING CASH TO PEOPLE IN CRISIS

By David Peppiatt, Director of Humanitarian Cash, British Red Cross

Much has been said about cash aid (I use this as a far from perfect shorthand for delivering cash and voucher assistance). Is it really a game changer for the humanitarian system or just hype? Will humanitarian aid in 2030 be marked by a shift away from delivery of relief in-kind to digital transfers of money?

Sustainable digital age

By the Department of Information Technologies of Turkish Red Crescent

Digital Change is a concept which cannot be explained by using new technologies in internet applications, developing mobile applications or institutionally appearing more in all channels of social media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc.). It is a concept that requires different strategies and implementations for per area and does not have a single solution. 

THE FUTURE OF LIVELIHOODS – 2030

By the Livelihood Centre

WHAT HAS STRATEGY 2020 MEANT FOR LIVELIHOODS PROGRAMMING IN RCRC?

Livelihood is both an area of focus (AoF) in IFRC Strategy 2020 and a key area of work for the Red Cross Red Crescent (RCRC) National Societies, and IFRC. Livelihoods is highlighted in Strategic Objective 1: Save lives, protect livelihoods and strengthen recovery from disasters and crises.

Most popular pieces

Women in Leadership

Ms. Fine Tu’itupou Arnold, Secretary General of Cook Islands Red Cross Society  speaks about the importance of women leadership in the network. Fine shares her reflections on women leadership at different levels of the organization.

 

Climate change and small island states

By Ms. Fine TU’ITUPOU ARNOLD, Secretary General of Cook Islands Red Cross Society

As someone born, raised, educated and living in small island developing states (SIDS) in the Pacific, I am very familiar with the challenges we face.  We are collections of tiny countries, far from anywhere – the islands that make up our countries are often, themselves, strung out over vast distances.

RETHINKING THE FUTURE OF VOLUNTEERING?

By Shaun Hazeldine, IFRC 

Volunteering is not only critical to the organisational model, affording a direct and intimate link with communities all over the world and enabling social, development and humanitarian action on a scale that would be impossible otherwise, but volunteering itself can, if managed well, deliver enormous benefits for individuals, of social inclusion, building self-confidence, skills and promoting social engagement enabling a more active, enlightened and compassionate citizenry.