Strategy 2030

A Platform for Change

Results so far

Strategy 2030 stands for

Strategy 2030 is about change. It is about changing not just what we do, but how we do it, so that we are even better able to save lives, accompany people and support their resilience. It is about the changes that are shifting the world today and those that lie ahead.  It is about how these changes present both threats and opportunities to humanity, and how they are shifting the very nature of vulnerability, about who is vulnerable, why, where and for how long. It recognises that new approaches are needed to tackle the persistent challenges that continue to burden people around the world alongside the many new emerging challenges. It is also a strategy of hope and trust  in the power of humanity to mobilise for good and to drive positive change.

This is what we’ve heard so far. The final draft strategy will be available for public comment from mid-July to the end of August.

Strategy 2030

A Platform for Change

Results so far

Strategy 2030 stands for

Strategy 2030 is about change. It is about changing not just what we do, but how we do it, so that we are even better able to save lives, accompany people and support their resilience. It is about the changes that are shifting the world today and those that lie ahead.  It is about how these changes present both threats and opportunities to humanity, and how they are shifting the very nature of vulnerability, about who is vulnerable, why, where and for how long. It recognises that new approaches are needed to tackle the persistent challenges that continue to burden people around the world alongside the many new emerging challenges. It is also a strategy of hope and trust  in the power of humanity to mobilise for good and to drive positive change.

This is what we’ve heard so far. The final draft strategy, once approved from the Governing Board, will be available for public comment from the end of May to the end of July.

Thought pieces from around the network

Latest pieces

Outer space and Collective intelligence for humanitarian action

 

Check out this webinar on how can we be more effective as a network as we undergo a digital transformation.

WHAT IF WE BELIEVE WE NEED TO CHANGE, BUT DO NOTHING DIFFERENTLY?

By Lucy Morris, Senior National Society Development and Partnership Adviser, British Red Cross

Some perspectives on organisational transformation in the Movement.

We will not remain relevant humanitarian actors unless every part of our International Red Cross and Red Crescent movement can increase its ability to learn and adapt to the world around us.  And my experience as a National Society Development and Partnership Adviser, is that the issue of how we change and develop our internal capacity for change is often overlooked. 

HOW THE FRENCH RED CROSS IS TRANSFORMING ITSELF TO BE MORE FIT FOR FUTURE CHALLENGES

By Grégoire Ducret, Director of Strategy and Innovation, French Red Cross

Our transformation starts with adopting an agile culture of organization, to be able to act “anywhere and anytime”, strengthening the positive social impact of the French Red Cross. This requires building a strong common culture and ensuring workplace well-being, giving the means to each volunteer and employee to adapt to change, to give a contemporary meaning to the mission and to the historical values ​​of the association, to promote cooperation and to allow everyone to learn and engage.

Most popular pieces

MONEY MATTERS: DELIVERING CASH TO PEOPLE IN CRISIS

By David Peppiatt, Director of Humanitarian Cash, British Red Cross

Much has been said about cash aid (I use this as a far from perfect shorthand for delivering cash and voucher assistance). Is it really a game changer for the humanitarian system or just hype? Will humanitarian aid in 2030 be marked by a shift away from delivery of relief in-kind to digital transfers of money?

Climate change and small island states

By Ms. Fine TU’ITUPOU ARNOLD, Secretary General of Cook Islands Red Cross Society

As someone born, raised, educated and living in small island developing states (SIDS) in the Pacific, I am very familiar with the challenges we face.  We are collections of tiny countries, far from anywhere – the islands that make up our countries are often, themselves, strung out over vast distances.

RETHINKING THE FUTURE OF VOLUNTEERING?

By Shaun Hazeldine, IFRC 

Volunteering is not only critical to the organisational model, affording a direct and intimate link with communities all over the world and enabling social, development and humanitarian action on a scale that would be impossible otherwise, but volunteering itself can, if managed well, deliver enormous benefits for individuals, of social inclusion, building self-confidence, skills and promoting social engagement enabling a more active, enlightened and compassionate citizenry.