Global challenge 2:

Crisis and disasters

5 Global challenges – What do we need to prioritize this decade?

The five global challenges emerging from the Strategy 2030 consultations are a balance of existing and emerging risks, that are most relevant to our mandate and our scope of influence. These are inseparable from each other and are heavily influenced by trends identified in our Global Thematic Futures Report.

The convergence, frequency and scale of increasing natural disasters, fragility, violence and conflict in the world is threatening efforts to end extreme poverty. Disasters are predicted to increase over the next decade as global temperatures climb and cause more frequent and intense weather events. While there are fewer large-scale interstate conflicts, other forms of conflict and violence have increased since 2010 and are prolonged with system wide implications.

Disasters and crisis are increasingly concentrated in complex settings. By 2030, almost half of the world’s poor are expected to live in countries affected by fragility, conflict and violence – mostly in Africa and the Middle East. As a result of the rate of urbanisation in Africa and Asia, we are seeing increasing disaster risks and violence in cities. As many as one in every three people living in cities will be in informal settlements within the period and will experience significant deprivation. Beyond traditional drivers of disasters and crisis, our increasing dependence on technology brings new risks and vulnerabilities including technological collapse, cyber and digital risks, ethics and digital vulnerability implications.

Our focus over the coming decade must be on mitigating the vulnerabilities and disadvantages resulting from all types of crisis and disasters for all people, especially the most vulnerable, so that all are able to thrive.

Consultations suggest integrating disaster risk reduction and response programming across migration, climate change, food security, livelihoods, urban environments, health and digital vulnerabilities to ensure that we are working in an integrated manner, particularly in crisis and fragile contexts.

As a global network we will become better at anticipating and adapting to increasing and emerging risks, and work on stronger preventative measures. We will also expand approaches that promotes choice-enabling programming and actions as mechanisms that help communities decide for themselves what type of support they need within their contexts.

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THE FUTURE OF PROTECTION

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The future of urban

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5 Global challenges – What do we need to prioritize this decade?

The five global challenges emerging from the Strategy 2030 consultations are a balance of existing and emerging risks, that are most relevant to our mandate and our scope of influence. These are inseparable from each other and are heavily influenced by trends identified in our Global Thematic Futures Report.

The convergence, frequency and scale of increasing natural disasters, fragility, violence and conflict in the world is threatening efforts to end extreme poverty. Disasters are predicted to increase over the next decade as global temperatures climb and cause more frequent and intense weather events. While there are fewer large-scale interstate conflicts, other forms of conflict and violence have increased since 2010 and are prolonged with system wide implications.

Disasters and crisis are increasingly concentrated in complex settings. By 2030, almost half of the world’s poor are expected to live in countries affected by fragility, conflict and violence – mostly in Africa and the Middle East. As a result of the rate of urbanisation in Africa and Asia, we are seeing increasing disaster risks and violence in cities. As many as one in every three people living in cities will be in informal settlements within the period and will experience significant deprivation. Beyond traditional drivers of disasters and crisis, our increasing dependence on technology brings new risks and vulnerabilities including technological collapse, cyber and digital risks, ethics and digital vulnerability implications.

Our focus over the coming decade must be on mitigating the vulnerabilities and disadvantages resulting from all types of crisis and disasters for all people, especially the most vulnerable, so that all are able to thrive.

Consultations suggest integrating disaster risk reduction and response programming across migration, climate change, food security, livelihoods, urban environments, health and digital vulnerabilities to ensure that we are working in an integrated manner, particularly in crisis and fragile contexts.

As a global network we will become better at anticipating and adapting to increasing and emerging risks, and work on stronger preventative measures. We will also expand approaches that promotes choice-enabling programming and actions as mechanisms that help communities decide for themselves what type of support they need within their contexts.

Related content

THE FUTURE OF PROTECTION

By Amjad Saleem, IFRC 

Read more

The future of urban

By Aynur Kadihasanoglu
Senior Advisor for Urban Resilience , Global Disaster Preparedness Center (GDPC)

Read more

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