Global challenge 4:

Migration and identity

5 Global challenges – What do we need to prioritize this decade?

The five global challenges emerging from the Strategy 2030 consultations are a balance of existing and emerging risks, that are most relevant to our mandate and our scope of influence. These are inseparable from each other and are heavily influenced by trends identified in our Global Thematic Futures Report.

The movement of people, whether voluntary or involuntary, is one of the defining features of the 21st century. Migration has helped improve people’s lives in both origin and destination countries and has offered millions of people worldwide to forge safe and meaningful lives.

The number of migrants globally has grown since 2000 alongside global population growth, and in some part of the developing world, is overtaking fertility as a main driver of population growth. This is projected to keep increasing as rising instances of conflict and poverty, a lack of quality employment opportunities and climate change redraws the map of where people can live.

Migration is a concern for us because of the increasing risks that people face when they are on the move. These risks include exploitation and abuse at the hands of traffickers and other criminal groups, as well deprivations that are caused by policies that limit access to basic services and care. These journeys are particularly difficult for stateless people and those who do not have official proof of identity.

There are underlying tensions that migration is increasingly challenging the conventional definitions of citizenship, and identity. It is being used in some countries to fuel tension and even xenophobia. It has been blamed for economic and social marginalisation and has been instrumental in political debates and elections.  This is often accompanied – in migrants and host communities alike – by stress and worries about identity, about the changing fabric and make up of societies, and what it means to ‘belong’.

We want all people who migrate, to be safe, be treated humanely and with dignity. We want all people to have the support they need to thrive in inclusive societies.

The consultations on Strategy 2030 suggest an expansion and integration of migration and inclusion programming and services across all service areas. We will expand our support to migrants at all points along major migratory routes. This includes scaling up our work to foster and promote inclusion and social cohesion, recognizing that these issues are interlinked to the wellbeing and flourishing of all people both in home and host communities. We will pay particular attention to the links between climate change and migration, recognising that the coming decade will likely see millions of people leave their homes because of changing weather.

We will improve how we work across borders, allowing for more connected programmes between countries, National Societies and along migration routes.

We will strive to ensure that our programming is reflective of the societies we live in and expand the diversity and inclusion in our staff and volunteers. We will speak up to influence global, regional and domestic policy and advocacy dialogue for a more inclusive world.

5 Global challenges – What do we need to prioritize this decade?

The five global challenges emerging from the Strategy 2030 consultations are a balance of existing and emerging risks, that are most relevant to our mandate and our scope of influence. These are inseparable from each other and are heavily influenced by trends identified in our Global Thematic Futures Report.

The movement of people, whether voluntary or involuntary, is one of the defining features of the 21st century. Migration has helped improve people’s lives in both origin and destination countries and has offered millions of people worldwide to forge safe and meaningful lives.

The number of migrants globally has grown since 2000 alongside global population growth, and in some part of the developing world, is overtaking fertility as a main driver of population growth. This is projected to keep increasing as rising instances of conflict and poverty, a lack of quality employment opportunities and climate change redraws the map of where people can live.

Migration is a concern for us because of the increasing risks that people face when they are on the move. These risks include exploitation and abuse at the hands of traffickers and other criminal groups, as well deprivations that are caused by policies that limit access to basic services and care. These journeys are particularly difficult for stateless people and those who do not have official proof of identity.

There are underlying tensions that migration is increasingly challenging the conventional definitions of citizenship, and identity. It is being used in some countries to fuel tension and even xenophobia. It has been blamed for economic and social marginalisation and has been instrumental in political debates and elections.  This is often accompanied – in migrants and host communities alike – by stress and worries about identity, about the changing fabric and make up of societies, and what it means to ‘belong’.

We want all people who migrate, to be safe, be treated humanely and with dignity. We want all people to have the support they need to thrive in inclusive societies.

Strategy 2030 envisages the expansion and integration of migration and inclusion programming and services across all service areas. We will expand our support to migrants at all points along major migratory routes. This includes scaling up our work to foster and promote inclusion and social cohesion, recognizing that these issues are interlinked to the wellbeing and flourishing of all people both in home and host communities. We will pay particular attention to the links between climate change and migration, recognising that the coming decade will likely see millions of people leave their homes because of changing weather.

We will improve how we work across borders, allowing for more connected programmes between countries, National Societies and along migration routes.

We will strive to ensure that our programming is reflective of the societies we live in and expand the diversity and inclusion in our staff and volunteers. We will speak up to influence global, regional and domestic policy and advocacy dialogue for a more inclusive world.

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