Global challenge 5:

Values, power and inclusion

5 Global challenges – What do we need to prioritize this decade?

The five global challenges emerging from the Strategy 2030 consultations are a balance of existing and emerging risks, that are most relevant to our mandate and our scope of influence. These are inseparable from each other and are heavily influenced by trends identified in our Global Thematic Futures Report.

Values-based tensions are manifesting in different ways in different places, creating new fault lines within and between countries, regions and communities. The benefits of economic and technological progress are not being equally shared, and the pace of change is leaving many political, regulatory and welfare systems unable to cope, fostering division and aggravating grievances. The implications of globalisation and increasing inequality is fuelling a push back on elitism, but also fanning populism, nationalism, and cultural and religious clashes.

Many previously marginalised voices are now demanding that they are present for and involved in decision-making. In some countries, efforts to secure recognition and equality for a widening range of social groups – defined by characteristics such as race, ethnicity, religion, gender identity or sexual orientation – are now influencing elections.

The consequences of these changes are being seen every day across a range of issues. Much-loved and well-known institutions are being challenged as expectations change, accountability is demanded, and trust is no longer a given. In many places, the space for civil society is shrinking, with people and communities refusing to be spoken for and demanding change from both governments and institutions. Multilateralism is under increasing strain. At the same time, many governments are asserting sovereignty or even rejecting the involvement of outside organizations in domestic affairs.  Local-led responses to disasters and crisis will increasingly drive international response in the coming decade.

Values are increasingly seen to be a source of division rather than unity, not just globally but also within regions and countries.

At their worst, these transformations risk giving rise to a more disconnected, less humane, less empathetic world. These issues illustrate an unapologetic subordination of human lives to other gains – an anti-humanitarianism. We see this playing out in the politicization of humanitarian crises, making it increasingly difficult for neutral and impartial aid agencies to operate independently.

We want to promote inclusive and fair humanitarian values that encourage a positive, hopeful change for humanity.

Expanded humanitarian education programmes will focus on combating rising anti-humanitarianism, xenophobia and polarisation, as well as improving access for people whose education has been disrupted by war, disaster or displacement. Our education programmes will also prepare people for the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century.

We will consciously invest in shifting power structures in all spaces – communities, institutions, and our own network. At the same time, our work in diversity and inclusion will expand, particularly in our work in support of women and girls. We will recognise the impact gender inequalities have on people’s ability to thrive and increase our support for women’s leadership across all levels of our organisations.

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Power and governance

Extract from the global thematic futures report.

Read more

5 Global challenges – What do we need to prioritize this decade?

The five global challenges emerging from the Strategy 2030 consultations are a balance of existing and emerging risks, that are most relevant to our mandate and our scope of influence. These are inseparable from each other and are heavily influenced by trends identified in our Global Thematic Futures Report.

Values-based tensions are manifesting in different ways in different places, creating new fault lines within and between countries, regions and communities. The benefits of economic and technological progress are not being equally shared, and the pace of change is leaving many political, regulatory and welfare systems unable to cope, fostering division and aggravating grievances. The implications of globalisation and increasing inequality is fuelling a push back on elitism, but also fanning populism, nationalism, and cultural and religious clashes.

Many previously marginalised voices are now demanding that they are present for and involved in decision-making. In some countries, efforts to secure recognition and equality for a widening range of social groups – defined by characteristics such as race, ethnicity, religion, gender identity or sexual orientation – are now influencing elections.

The consequences of these changes are being seen every day across a range of issues. Much-loved and well-known institutions are being challenged as expectations change, accountability is demanded, and trust is no longer a given. In many places, the space for civil society is shrinking, with people and communities refusing to be spoken for and demanding change from both governments and institutions. Multilateralism is under increasing strain. At the same time, many governments are asserting sovereignty or even rejecting the involvement of outside organizations in domestic affairs.  Local-led responses to disasters and crisis will increasingly drive international response in the coming decade.

Values are increasingly seen to be a source of division rather than unity, not just globally but also within regions and countries.

At their worst, these transformations risk giving rise to a more disconnected, less humane, less empathetic world. These issues illustrate an unapologetic subordination of human lives to other gains – an anti-humanitarianism. We see this playing out in the politicization of humanitarian crises, making it increasingly difficult for neutral and impartial aid agencies to operate independently.

We want to promote inclusive and fair humanitarian values that encourage a positive, hopeful change for humanity.

Expanded humanitarian education programmes will focus on combating rising anti-humanitarianism, xenophobia and polarisation, as well as improving access for people whose education has been disrupted by war, disaster or displacement. Our education programmes will also prepare people for the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century.

We will consciously invest in shifting power structures in all spaces – communities, institutions, and our own network. At the same time, our work in diversity and inclusion will expand, particularly in our work in support of women and girls. We will recognise the impact gender inequalities have on people’s ability to thrive and increase our support for women’s leadership across all levels of our organisations.

Related content

Power and governance

Extract from the global thematic futures report.

Read more

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