Strategy 2030

A Platform for Change

Strategy 2030 stands for

Strategy 2030 is about change. It is about changing not just what we do, but how we do it, so that we are even better able to save lives, accompany people and support their resilience. It is about the changes that are shifting the world today and those that lie ahead.  It is about how these changes present both threats and opportunities to humanity, and how they are shifting the very nature of vulnerability, about who is vulnerable, why, where and for how long. It recognises that new approaches are needed to tackle the persistent challenges that continue to burden people around the world alongside the many new emerging challenges. It is also a strategy of hope and trust  in the power of humanity to mobilise for good and to drive positive change.

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Thought pieces from around the network

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6 THINGS WE NEED TO BE GREAT AT DURING S2030

By Alexander Mathieu, British Red Cross 

Going to scale:  In 2016, I attended a roundtable to discuss plans to mitigate a major hunger crisis in southern Africa.  Agencies and donors put proposals on the table to import cereals, to oversee mass targeting for cash-based assistance and to diversify the mono-cropping that is a root cause of food insecurity in the region. The Red Cross offered a few small, scattered projects.

HOW WE STARTED TO REDESIGN OUR VOLUNTEER APPROACHES

By Chris Reed, British Red Cross 

While written about the global Red Cross/ Red Crescent Movement, the way it resonates with the work we’re doing at the British Red Cross is uncanny. So much has been written about the changing nature of volunteering in the UK and globally, so it’s heartening to see how seriously people are beginning to take the important issue of putting the volunteer themselves at the heart of the experience we offer. 

THESE WERE AMONG THE MOST FREQUENTLY USED WORDS DURING STRATEGY 2030 CONSULTATIONS

IFRC, S2030 team

After speaking with over 7,000 people around the world on the Future Red Cross and Red Crescent, these were among the most repeated words. 

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NINE TRENDS THAT WILL SHAPE HOW NATIONAL SOCIETIES WILL WORK TOGETHER DURING STRATEGY 2030

By Alexander Matheou, British Red Cross 

At British Red Cross, we’ve been writing our international strategy at the same time as the Strategy 2030 consultations have been taking place, so we’ve been able to benefit from the S2030 horizon scanning of external trends, and from the reflections on how we’re going to work together as a network of National Societies over the coming years.  The ‘how’ has been critical to us in our planning, because while our ambitions are big, we know that alone we are small, and our success depends on our ability to form great partnerships with sister NS, to participate in great coalitions of NS working towards a common aim, and to find the best ways to engage with the IFRC Secretariat and ICRC.

RETHINKING THE FUTURE OF VOLUNTEERING?

By Shaun Hazeldine, IFRC 

Volunteering is not only critical to the organisational model, affording a direct and intimate link with communities all over the world and enabling social, development and humanitarian action on a scale that would be impossible otherwise, but volunteering itself can, if managed well, deliver enormous benefits for individuals, of social inclusion, building self-confidence, skills and promoting social engagement enabling a more active, enlightened and compassionate citizenry.

THE PROMISE AND PERIL OF DIGITAL IDENTIFICATION FOR AID DISTRIBUTION

A collaboration between IFRC and emerge85, University of Michigan, and 510.global

Across the world, an increasing number of governments are embracing digital and biometric technology to transform how services are distributed and needs are assessed. Governments require the basic ability to track citizens, residents, and visitors, and digital identification systems have transformed how modern borders function. In emerging markets, the adoption rate has been particularly rapid. In India, a massive digital and biometric identification program called Aadhar is streamlining how services are disseminated, taxes collected, and votes cast in the world’s largest democracy. The promise of these digital systems is a combination of increased efficiency and reduced corruption through tighter control of resources.

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