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Futures thought pieces

Driving a global conversation through a series of invited thought pieces by Red Cross and Red Crescent staff.

Future of Volunteering
What might volunteering look like over the next decade for the Red Cross and Red Crescent network?
We know that volunteering is changing – the Global Review of Volunteering and the IFRC 2018 Thematic Futures highlighted a number of ways in which this is affecting the Red Cross Red Crescent. There are different humanitarian needs, people are living and working in different ways, and technology is changing how we are connecting to each other.

What major trends might impact volunteering in your environment in 2030?
What is changing around how people are choosing to spend their time, how do they want to engage and what is important for them now and in the future?

We are exploring questions such as:
  1. Will Red Cross Red Crescent volunteers be service deliverers or agents of change?
  2. Whose concept of volunteering are we promoting?
  3. What will volunteering look like in a digital age?

As part of the process on the development of Strategy 2030, we are re-imagining volunteering in the Red Cross and Red Crescent. Join us as we go through an intensive scenarios and visioning process to explore different models and structures around volunteering that will allow for an agile, connected and engaged RCRC network over the next decade.

Adjmal Dulloo

IFRC Global Volunteering Coordinator

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @AdjmalD

The Future Of Climate

Defining challenges for climate change .
Climate change is one of the defining challenges of our generation, its consequences at the heart of the Red Cross Red Crescent mission to prevent and alleviate human suffering.

Climate-related disasters such as heatwaves, floods, droughts and the diseases they encourage are sadly familiar enough, but we now face a global rise in these risks. Some of these rising risks are already locked in due to past emissions, and there is very limited time to prevent them from getting worse.

Implications for the Red Cross Red Crescent network:
  • How can the Red Cross Red Crescent Movement better anticipate extremes for early action? How can National Societies test, implement and adapt approaches such as FbF?
  • What role should National Societies play in the expected rise of loss and damage, making sure the most vulnerable are supported?
  • If youth are central to the Movement, how can we use their knowledge, talents and innovation to transform global climate action over the next decade?
What do experts say about what might actually happen in the coming decades?
  • How can the Red Cross Red Crescent Movement better anticipate extremes for early action? How can National Societies test, implement and adapt approaches such as FbF?
  • What role should National Societies play in the expected rise of loss and damage, making sure the most vulnerable are supported?
  • If youth are central to the Movement, how can we use their knowledge, talents and innovation to transform global climate action over the next decade?

Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre

Future of Urban
For most of humanity, the future involves living in cities.
According to the UN, in the coming decades, 1.4 million people will be added to urban areas each week. Meanwhile, urban land area could triple globally in the timeline to 2030. Cities are also engines of national and global growth, accounting for 80 percent of global economic output. At the same time cities account for around 70 percent of global energy demand and greenhouse gas emissions. The future of urban is intrinsically linked to what is happening in all aspects of human life. Demographic trends are leading to increased single person households and new technologies are changing the way people live, work and socially connect. Some of these trends will shape the urban scape more than others and naturally will have significant implications for the society in general and the work of the Red Cross Red Crescent.
Six potential futures for the Red Cross Red Crescent network to reflect on?
  1. As urban microservices and mobility options become cheaper and more plentiful, what new possibilities will this introduce for National Societies’ outreach and local service delivery?
  2. With the increasing role of cities, how can National Societies position themselves as a key urban actor? How can they build on their auxiliary role to work with local governments to promote increased investment in reducing the exposure of the most vulnerable urban populations to disaster and climate change risks?
  3. How can we better combine solutions through a layered approach to help communities manage and address the complexity of risks they face?
  4. Diaspora communities already play an essential role in livelihoods and economic development. How can National Societies work together with diaspora communities to help them be engines of resilience as well?
  5. How can National Societies adapt their services to the emerging risks that urban communities face – such as urban food insecurity, especially in Africa? How can peer learning accelerate capacity development to match these increasing risks and harness the capacity of a young urban Africa?
  6. How can the Red Cross Red Crescent network take a leadership role, working in coalition with local to global partners, in preventing the impacts of forecastable and climate-related disasters in cities?

Aynur Kadihasanoglu

Senior Advisor for Urban Resilience at Global Disaster Preparedness Center (GDPC) and the American Red Cross International Services

Email: [email protected]

The Future Of Work

Impact on the types of jobs

Most experts warn of massive changes both in the types of jobs and in their quality. Many white collar and service jobs might disappear , others might also be transformed as they are enhanced . In high and middle income countries, the decline in manufacturing employment in response to automation are outweighed by service sector job growth.

 

What does this mean for the humanitarian sector ?

The purpose of this note is to provide an overview of current thinking around the future of work for Strategy 2030 and understand its implications for IFRC. A lot has been written on the fourth industrial revolution and The Future Of Work, so this note draws only on the most recent and comprehensive studies and literature reviews available on the net. Part 1 presents an overview of the future of work as described by experts. Part 2 briefl presents, as a “conversation starter” some of its implications for the IFRC – National Societies and the Secretariat

 

Will The Future Of Work all be about mobility ?

As in most exercises in futures and foresight, most of the studies are based on expert opinion and surveys of business leaders. What is nevertheless striking is that there is a consensus that the nature of work is changing radically. Opinions may vary on the pace, nature and location of disruption, but not on the fact that the process is already well underway and that individuals and organisations need to prepare and adapt to these disruptions NOW.

Gabriel Pictet

Email :[email protected]

 

Historical Timelines

When we think about the future of the organization, we need to consider as well our history. The following stories portray different historical periods in human history that have changed the way people live. This timelines not only have undercovered opportunities for human evolution but have also brought new types of vulnerabilities and risks. Share your thoughts on each piece.

A brief history of the nature of work

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