Transformation 4:

Inspiring and mobilising a global movement for good, with volunteers and young people at the centre

7 Transformations

5 Global challenges

Examples of change

Global School Climate Strikes

This is a change because it demonstrates the increasing influence that movements led by young people are driving social change for climate action

Read story

7 Transformations

The consultations indicate seven potential transformations that the IFRC network will need to embrace in order to rise to the 5 global challenges

On volunteers

Over the 2030 period, the Red Cross and Red Crescent will re-imagine volunteering and civic action in the 21st century, to open up and ensure a much larger and more effective network of humanitarians working for global good. Our commitment to this reimagination means that we will have an open mind of what volunteering means and develop different approaches to voluntary service.

Strategy 2030 re-imagines volunteering that capitalises on the opportunities of self-organising, and networked groups. The Red Cross and Red Crescent will find creative ways to connect volunteers across countries, and regions expanding from rigid national volunteer models to a distributed network of volunteers across borders co-creating and driving impact together. This will require a mutually transformative shift from utilising volunteers purely to deliver service, but rather to expand and support people in their own efforts to drive the change they seek in the world.

Re-imagined volunteering will use innovation, and digital engagement tools.

Re-imagined volunteering will be much more inclusive and diverse across multiple domains and of different identity and demographic groups.

On youth

Strategy 2030 envisages a network that embraces young people as enablers of people led resilience

  • Embrace the strategy’s “platform for change” philosophy, with National Societies placing their focus on how to catalyse or support young people to generate their own ideas and mobilise for change.
  • Build cultures and spaces that are designed by and driven by young people. A reduced bureaucracy will feature as a key component, approaches that are flatter and more direct and that enable quicker pathways to action and impact.
  • Demonstrate a passion for innovation and experimentation and have more appetite for risk
  • Help young people develop the skills and values needed to thrive in the 21st century, including new skillsets for work, entrepreneurialism, conflict resolution, creative thinking, problem solving and communication.
  • Be cause-driven in our communications and marketing efforts, clearly proclaiming what we believe in, what change we are seeking, and the success we are having.

Related content

Rethinking the future of volunteering?

By Shaun Hazeldine, IFRC Head of Innovation and Futures

Read more

Mirror Mirror on the wall... Pt1

By Marcel Stefanik, Global Coordinator Youth Engagement, IFRC

Read more

The future of volunteering

Facebook live

7 Transformations

The consultations indicate seven potential transformations that the IFRC network will need to embrace in order to rise to the 5 global challenges

On volunteers

Over the 2030 period, the Red Cross and Red Crescent will re-imagine volunteering and civic action in the 21st century, to open up and ensure a much larger and more effective network of humanitarians working for global good. Our commitment to this reimagination means that we will have an open mind of what volunteering means and develop different approaches to voluntary service.

Strategy 2030 re-imagines volunteering that capitalises on the opportunities of self-organising, and networked groups. The Red Cross and Red Crescent will find creative ways to connect volunteers across countries, and regions expanding from rigid national volunteer models to a distributed network of volunteers across borders co-creating and driving impact together. This will require a mutually transformative shift from utilising volunteers purely to deliver service, but rather to expand and support people in their own efforts to drive the change they seek in the world.

Re-imagined volunteering will use innovation, and digital engagement tools.

Re-imagined volunteering will be much more inclusive and diverse across multiple domains and of different identity and demographic groups.

On youth

Strategy 2030 envisages a network that embraces young people as enablers of people led resilience

  • Embrace the strategy’s “platform for change” philosophy, with National Societies placing their focus on how to catalyse or support young people to generate their own ideas and mobilise for change.
  • Build cultures and spaces that are designed by and driven by young people. A reduced bureaucracy will feature as a key component, approaches that are flatter and more direct and that enable quicker pathways to action and impact.
  • Demonstrate a passion for innovation and experimentation and have more appetite for risk
  • Help young people develop the skills and values needed to thrive in the 21st century, including new skillsets for work, entrepreneurialism, conflict resolution, creative thinking, problem solving and communication.
  • Be cause-driven in our communications and marketing efforts, clearly proclaiming what we believe in, what change we are seeking, and the success we are having.

Examples of change

Global School Climate Strikes

This is a change because it demonstrates the increasing influence that movements led by young people are driving social change for climate action

Read story

Related content

Rethinking the future of volunteering?

By Shaun Hazeldine, IFRC Head of Innovation and Futures

Read more

Mirror Mirror on the wall... Pt1

By Marcel Stefanik, Global Coordinator Youth Engagement, IFRC

Read more

The future of volunteering

Facebook live

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